Questions For a Hiring Manager To Ask a Potential Employee

 

There’s a lot of information available for someone who is preparing to go on a job; how to dress, how to answer difficult questions, even how to shake hands properly.

But what if you are the one doing the hiring? If you are new to the position as hiring manager, you could probably use some help as to what are the best ways to find an excellent employee for your company.

Interviewing countless people can be nerve-racking and tedious; especially if you are new to the job. And it becomes even more difficult if you get a huge response to your open position.

The best way to approach the hiring process is to ask first-rate questions which will help you narrow down your prospects. Here are several interview questions to get you started in finding the right person for the job…

The best way to approach the hiring process is to ask first-rate questions which will help you narrow down your prospects. Here are several interview questions to get you started in finding the right person for the job.

 

  1. Do you consider yourself a big picture person or a detail oriented person?

 

  1. How do you handle working with a team member who doesn’t pull their weight or who annoys you?

 

  1. How do you keep yourself organized?

 

  1. How would you describe your work style?

 

  1. What were the responsibilities of your last job?

 

  1. How do you handle having to give someone negative feedback?

 

  1. What makes you most satisfied in your job?

 

  1. Was there ever a time that you went above and beyond in a previous job?

 

  1. Where do you see yourself in five years?

 

  1. Describe your ideal work environment.

 

  1. Why are you interested in this job? What was it that made you apply for this position?

 

  1. Why are you leaving your current employer?

 

  1. Do you have any questions for me?

And finally, the question every prospective employee hates…..

      1. What are your strengths and weaknesses?

While it’s true everyone hates this question, it does serve a purpose. Strengths should be easy enough, as long as you don’t have a narcissist answering the question, but pay attention to someone who claims to have no weakness. What you are looking for is someone who can turn a weakness (I’m not the best with numbers) into a positive (but I’ve been taking a course to refresh my math skills).

After you’ve asked, and gotten satisfactory answers to the standard questions, or when you’ve narrowed down your prospects to a final list, ask some of the following questions to help you separate the wheat from the chaff. These questions will get your candidate to expose more about his personality, which can help you make the final decision on whether or not he’d fit in with the rest of his colleagues were he to be hired.

Most of these questions are unexpected in a traditional job interview, so you’ll have a good chance of hearing an unrehearsed answer.

  1. How would your best friend describe you?

 

  1. Tell me a fun, random thing about yourself.

 

  1. Tell me about your proudest achievement outside of work.

 

  1. If you could open your own business, what type of business would it be?

 

  1. What do you do to lessen stress?

Pay attention to the answer to the last question, in particular. The applicant may make an attempt at humor, but you should be aware if the answer relates, even jokingly, to drinking or drugs, you could have a potential problem on your hands. You’ll more likely have a better candidate if the applicant mentions a hobby or passion, rather than a joke at having two glasses of wine if he needs to chill.

Going through the above lists and picking the questions that pique your interest should help get you started on matching the perfect candidate to suit the needs of your company.

 

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